Curriculum

Curriculum Intent

As a teaching team, we have given much time and thought to our curriculum, how it is organised, how it is taught; explicitly and implicitly.  Our Curriculum defines our priorities, our relationships and our aspirations. We have worked hard to ensure that our curriculum is designed specifically for our children in our village school, whilst ensuring we adhere to the requirements of the National Curriculum putting our children in good stead for their future.

We respond to educational innovations and new approaches by continuing to work on reviewing and building our provision to be up-to-date and reflective of our ethos and values. Most recently, we have developed vocabulary progression to coincide with our skills progression to ensure clarity in how our children develop their knowledge over time.

We have created the below document to give an overview of what it is like to be a learner at Buxton, we hope that this helps to give a summary of what to expect at our school:


In this section of our website, you will find our curriculum information. Within each section, you will find the Intent, Implementation and Impact Information for each subject. Please do not hesitate to contact the school should you be unable to find what you are looking for.

Curriculum Statement

The curriculum is all the planned activities that we organise in order to promote learning and personal growth and development. It includes not only the formal requirements of the National Curriculum 2014, but also the additional and extra-curricular activities that the school organises in order to enrich the experience of the children. We believe that children need to be engaged and enjoy their learning, so our curriculum is practical and as active as possible.  Children need to become lifelong learners, and enjoy the wonders and mysteries of being a child.

Our Curriculum is not just about knowledge or skills, but about discovery, of our world, the fascinating things that make it an amazing place.  We want children to become good citizens, to become active members of the society in which they live.  We aim to develop a deep sense of morality and responsibility.  Children will learn this from the way they are treated and expected to behave. We aim to teach children how to grow into positive, responsible people, who can work and co-operate with others while developing knowledge and skills, so that they achieve their true potential and be the best they can.  This includes learning how to keep themselves and others safe, how to spot signs of grooming and bullying, and how to deal with these, should they happen.

Our school curriculum is underpinned by the values that we hold dear at our school. The curriculum is the means by which the school achieves its objective of educating children in the knowledge, skills and understanding that they need in order to lead fulfilling lives. At the heart of our curriculum lies our aim; ‘Achieving Excellence Together’. Through what and how we teach, through our relationships with the children and each other, we show children how to be considerate, accepting of difference, and how to demonstrate honesty, show respect and to take responsibility.

We value the way in which all children are unique, and our curriculum promotes respect for the views of each individual child, as well as for people of all cultures, beliefs and orientation. We value the spiritual and moral development of each person, as well as their intellectual and physical growth.

We value the importance of each person in our community. We organise our curriculum so that we promote co-operation and understanding between all members of our community.

Education influences and reflects the values of society, and the kind of society we want to be. It is important therefore, to recognise a set of common values and purposes that underpin the curriculum at Buxton Primary School and enable the school to achieve its aims.

We believe children learn better when they are excited and actively engaged; what excites children best is excellent teaching, which will challenge them and demonstrate what they are capable of achieving. When there is joy in what they are doing, they learn to love learning. The curriculum at Buxton reflects this.

We believe it is our job to bring out the best in people by providing an enjoyable, exciting learning environment. No child should be labelled as a failure and every child has something to offer. Every child should see their potential and believe they can achieve and meet their goals, and know that hard work and persistence is part of this.

Our goal in delivering the curriculum is to combine excellence in teaching with enjoyment of learning. Please see our planning documents in conjunction with this statement – this details how the National Curriculum is organised and enhanced through the Key Stages and year groups. As a teaching team we have given much time and thought to our curriculum, how it is organised, how it is taught; explicitly and implicitly.  Our Curriculum defines our priorities, our relationships, our aspirations – so our School!

Our Reception Curriculum 

During their first year at school children in Sea Turtle Class follow the ‘Early Years Foundation Stage Framework’. The emphasis is on learning through fun and practical, child-initiated and adult-led activities. The learning environment is organised to meet the needs of the individual children and the learning activities build on the children’s existing knowledge and abilities. The EYFS is organised into the following 7 Areas of Learning: 

The Prime Areas: 

  • Communication and language 
  • Physical development 
  • Personal, social and emotional development 

The specific areas of learning: 

  • Literacy 
  • Mathematics 
  • Understanding the world 
  • Expressive arts and design 

In the Moment Planning 

Children are most engaged when they are undertaking activities that are child initiated and based on their current interests. When children show high levels of involvement, this is when progress and development occurs, when the brain is at its most active. Planning in the moment helps to make this possible. 

By providing an open ended and enabling environment supported by skilful staff we are able to seize the moment when a child shows a level of interest and curiosity. We can then draw out and extend these moments. Different children will engage in a range of ways and ‘In the Moment Planning’ ensures that every child’s experiences are acknowledged, valued and built upon. 

Apart from phonics and maths all other written ‘planning’ is done retrospectively in the form of observations, records of the interactions and notes on outcomes. These observations are available for parents to look at on Tapestry and comment on throughout the year. 

Each week we choose ‘Focus Children’ and encourage parents to fill in a sheet highlighting interests at home, special events that may be happening as well as any concerns. This information feeds into the way we plan for each child in the environment and consider their next steps. 

Supporting children with SEND in our curriculum

Our school ethos and values are centred around developing children to become excellent citizens that are understanding of the rich and diverse world we live in.

Our ARCHER values of respect, responsibility, acceptance, consideration and honesty are at the heart of what we do. We know that everyone has something to offer.

Buxton Primary School prides itself on being a fully inclusive school, always striving to support and guide every child to suit their individual needs, not just for children with SEND, but for all of our children.

Teaching and learning for all pupils includes not only the formal requirements of the National Curriculum, but also the range of additional opportunities that the school organises to enrich the experiences of our children such as enrichment sessions, outdoor learning, nurture, music tuition and more. These mostly have an aim of developing lifelong skills that are transferrable to the classroom.

In order for our children with SEND or SEMH needs to have equal opportunities to grow and develop, we have made and continue to make adaptations across all areas. Some examples of this are below:

  • Effective identification of need process. Identifying need early and acting upon this in a timely manner ensures that children with SEND are given the best possible chances of success. PPPs (peronalised provision plans) and Passports are developed in line with the Norfolk SEND Provision Expected at SEN Support document to ensure provision is of the highest standard.
  • Quality First Teaching. Ensuring that our teachers plan and deliver quality teaching which is adapted to the needs of our children, not just differentiated by ability.
  • Adult support. Having a high level of adult support for our children with SEND ensures that they are able to access the curriculum and all learning opportunities matched to their needs.
  • Interventions / workshops. All children take part in workshops to develop their skills, this is especially supportive of our children with SEND.
  • Pre-teaching. Children are pre-taught topics so that when they take part in the lesson, they are able to contribute, build confidence and have the best opportunities to learn.
  • Adaptations to activities and doing things in different ways such as: mind maps, talking time, thinking time, scaffolding, ‘I do, we do, you do’ sessions, peer work, small steps etc.
  • Subject Leaders ensure that SEND provision is monitored and adapted as required as part of their role to lead subjects effectively. SEND on planning is clear and designed to support the needs of the children in the cohort.
  • The PSHE curriculum involves teaching children about diversity, not just in culture, but in how we are all different. Our Votes for Schools sessions regularly highlight difference and build our children’s understanding of each other. 
  • Access to technology to support learning.
  • Assessment procedures are adapted to children’s needs with an aim of building confidence in abilities.

Our SENDCo leads the support for our children with SEND and/or SEMH needs, guiding and supporting staff to ensure all children have an equal chance of success. The SENDCo also liaises with various external agencies; Early Intervention, Community Team and Inclusion Team to name a few. This ensures provision meets the most up-to-date advice and guidance.

We also have a fully qualified speech and language specialist who leads the support for children with communication needs across the school. The school uses various programmes tailored to child need, completing 1:1 sessions and using programmes such as NELI.

Our phonics lead has developed our own Systematic Synthetic phonics programme to support children in learning to read. Our children with SEND have extra sessions and are also given opportunities to learn how to read in different ways, adapted to their specific needs.

The school also buys into external support from educational psychologists and specialist support teachers to help identify specific needs.

Subjects

English

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

English has a pre-eminent place in education and in society. A high-quality education in English will teach pupils to speak and write fluently so that they can communicate their ideas and emotions to others, and through their reading and listening, others can communicate with them. Through reading in particular, pupils have a chance to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually. Literature, especially, plays a key role in such development. Reading also enables pupils both to acquire knowledge and to build on what they already know.

National curriculum 2014


At Buxton Primary School we believe that a high quality English curriculum should give every child the chance to prepare for their future through developing a love of reading, writing and discussion. Our well-organised, progressive syllabus closely follows the aims of the National Curriculum to enable all children to:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • show competence in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations and participating in debate.

Books are central to our curriculum; all children are regularly exposed to carefully selected high-quality texts across a range of styles and genres. These are used as a vehicle for learning across the curriculum and help to promote the enjoyment of reading alongside class work, our school libraries, Norfolk library service visits, reading challenges, book fairs and author visits.

These texts offer new rich vocabulary, providing children with the tools to become confident communicators, readers, and writers – this language knowledge feeds into written work, enhances comprehension and helps analyse authorial craft. We encourage children to take pride in their work as they learn to adapt their language and style to suit the purpose and intended audience for their writing, enhancing meaning through specific choice of grammar and punctuation. We use Pupil Premium funding to support disadvantaged children and children with SEND to access books and texts at an appropriate level (often through a range of technological means) to match their abilities as well as accessing higher level age-appropriate texts through whole-class reading sessions.

Higher attaining children are challenged in all areas through the questions they are asked to extend their thinking and their ability to apply skills across a range of genres and for a range of purposes. Older children also enjoy reading with younger peers and celebrate a love of books through regular reading assemblies.

The curriculum at Buxton is carefully sequenced and progressive both across year groups and key stages so children build on existing learning and knowledge to embed them before exploring and developing new skills. Our curriculum has specific local relevance to enhance the knowledge the children have of our region and provide them with the opportunity to write with confidence about what they know. For example through travel brochures on different coastal towns or diary writing about the Norfolk Broads. We have had visits from local authors to develop children’s love of reading and writing and inspire our young people to think about the opportunities they have for the future. Our children will leave Buxton Primary having had the opportunity to master skills in reading, writing and speaking/ listening that will prepare them both for secondary education and life beyond the school gates.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs.

Teachers carry out formal teacher assessment at the end of each term in reading, writing and spelling, punctuation and grammar. Children also take part in reading age and spelling age assessments where appropriate. These results are analysed and teachers prepare workshops, interventions and in-lesson support systems to ensure all children (including SEND, higher attainers and disadvantaged children) are guided to make the best progress. Parents are informed of progress throughout the year through parents evenings, educational bulletins and formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


Persuasive Writing

Children apply for the prestigious role of Buxton Advocate

Mathsy Writing

A love of writing is encouraged in all subjects

Mystery Reading

Developing children’s curiosity and sense of adventure through reading

Reading and writing in reception

Exploring authors

Classes working together

Older children model leading roles to encourage a love of reading and writing

Maths

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

At Buxton Primary School our overall aim is to ensure that every child is provided with the opportunity to achieve to their fullest potential in mathematics.

In order to achieve this goal, we approach our curriculum in a broad and balanced way. 

Above all else, children at Buxton develop a love for maths. We do this through using maths in fun and practical ways, not only in lessons, but through extra-curricular sessions such as enrichment courses and forest school sessions.  We enable the children to apply their mathematical knowledge to other subjects across the curriculum such as measuring in cookery and data handling in science and research projects.  This breadth of knowledge will prepare them for life beyond school and will help them to embed the knowledge taught into long-term memory.

Maths skills are taught progressively using our small steps planning which has been adapted from the white rose scheme to suit our school and our learners.   Opportunities are given to revisit other areas of the maths curriculum in lesson starters, plenaries and problem solving activities, which are not linked to the main lesson, so that maths is not taught in standalone blocks.  This further ensures children are taught a depth of knowledge, revisiting topics and going deeper into their concepts often to commit them to long-term memory.

We teach using a concrete, pictorial and abstract (CPA) approach, providing our pupils with the scaffolding required to access the learning at all abilities.  We teach depth over repetition to ensure that higher attaining children develop fluency, mathematical reasoning and competence in solving increasingly sophisticated problems.  Maths workshops and 1:1 interventions are used to develop children’s core maths skills and provide them with the basic skills to prepare them for life. Opportunities are given to our SEND and disadvantaged children to ensure they are able to progress alongside their peers. Teachers plan for these children specifically and ensure all adults are well prepared to develop children’s individual skills.

Not only do we ensure children have a broad experience, children are also given the opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge through participating in times tables battles online with local schools and participate in sponsored number challenges.

Children are taught to be confident mathematicians who are not afraid to take risks.  We do this through opportunities for problem solving and reasoning through discussions, questioning and group activities. Learning maths skills at Buxton is closely linked with our growth mindset approach. We teach children to show grit, perseverance, resilience and motivation when developing their maths skills to prepare them for the next step in their education. Children know that mistakes help us to learn well.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs.

Teachers carry out formal teacher assessment at the end of each term in maths. Assessments are directly matched to the learning within Buxton’s curriculum so that teachers can measure children’s progress accurately against what has been taught. These results are analysed and teachers prepare workshops, interventions and in-lesson support systems to ensure all children (including SEND, higher attainers and disadvantaged children) are guided to make the best progress. Parents are informed of progress throughout the year through parents evenings, educational bulletins and formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


Problem solving

Children work together to solve problems

Maths in reception

Children explore maths concepts when learning through play

ICT and maths

ICT is often used to support maths teaching

Documenting maths

Children note their learning in different ways

Using equipment

From a young age, children learn to use mathematical equipment

Long-term Memory

Teaching maths in interesting and fun ways supports children to retain knowledge

Science

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

At Buxton Primary School we believe that science should stimulate and excite children’s curiosity about the wider world around them, whilst helping them to understand processes crucial to our life on Earth. As an investigation of the physical, chemical and biological aspects of the world we live in and beyond, it is a body of knowledge (outlined by the programmes of study of the National Curriculum) that we aim to build up through questioning and experimental testing of ideas.

Our aim for all Buxton Primary pupils is to value science as a way of understanding the world around them. Although the support we provide for disadvantaged children and children with SEND differs from the challenges encouraged on higher attaining pupils, this aim remains the same.  

We encourage all children to ask lots of questions and supply them with a range of resources and technology to help them comfortably and confidently plan and engage with the following five different lines of enquiry: observing over time; pattern seeking; identifying, classifying and grouping; comparative and fair testing as well as research using secondary resources. 

Each child will be able to understand their world in the broadest sense possible. Starting from within our local context and working outwards, our pupils will use their science learning from our school to help them become global citizens who will find their place in this diverse, multicultural yet interconnected world.

Opportunities for children to develop their science skills outside of discrete lessons are provided in a variety of ways. Enrichment sessions of ‘mad science’ and our Forest Schools provision develops our children’s love of science and inquisitively. At Buxton we celebrate science week through providing practical sessions where children are encouraged to work across year groups. 

By building on prior knowledge and vocabulary, each unit of study has been carefully designed to be progressive and engaging, making sure that each child’s journey to becoming an inquisitive young scientist is effective and lasting.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs.

Teachers carry out formal teacher assessment at the end of each unit and carry out an overall teacher assessment at the end of each term in the units taught. Parents are informed of progress throughout the year through parents evenings, educational bulletins and formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


Collaborative working

Older children work on projects with younger children to share their expertise and inspire a love of science

Periscopes

Children use design skills to create scientific products

Forest Schools

Children learn about our immediate environment and its biological make up in Forest Schools

Enrichment

Gardening enrichment develops children’s understanding of how plants grow

Lunch clubs

Lunch clubs are another opportunity to learn about gravity, forces and balance

Crucial Crew

Visits provide another opportunity to develop children’s depth of understanding in science

Phonics/Early Reading

Overall Intent

To ensure that our whole school approach to the teaching of Phonics enables ALL children to be readers and writers.

All children access a rigorous, well planned, phonics programme that is delivered consistently throughout the school by ALL staff. Our methods and resources are embedded within our programme ensuring that children are exposed to a consistent phonics education. This consistency enables children to build on previous learning whilst consolidating their knowledge and application skills. All staff are well trained and receive regular CPD and support from the Phonics Lead to ensure they are confident to deliver our school Phonics Programme.

At Buxton Primary School we are proud to have developed and implemented our own bespoke phonics scheme, our ‘Systematic Synthetic Phonics Programme’ developed specifically for our children. Even before our pupil’s start school we provide information to parent’s about phase one and the importance of embedding these skills and what they can do to support these skills before their child starts school.


What is in a lesson?

All phonics lessons from Reception to the end of Key Stage 1 follow the same format. All lessons are fast paced and do not exceed 25 minutes each day. They begin with a quick ‘Revise and Rehearse’ where children recap on previous learning and apply this to reading and writing. They are then taught a new grapheme or alternative grapheme in Phase 5. We then apply this new learning to reading words and sentences. We may use some Alien words within this part of the lesson. Moving on, the children can then apply this in their writing (on whiteboards or within phonics books). They have the opportunity to ‘Ask the Question’- a method developed to ensure that children can make successful attempts at spellings. The final part of the lesson can be used to consolidate previous learning for example Tricky words or common exception words. It may be used to teach Handwriting Families or for challenges and games.

How is phonics embedded in our curriculum?

Children have the opportunity to apply and develop their skills in phonics (reading, writing and spelling) many times throughout a school day. Phonics lessons happen daily within Reception and Key Stage 1. Our scheme joins together the skills needed for reading, writing and spelling and follows the same approach with the same imagery and ‘sayings’. All staff are trained in how to use and deliver our scheme and they apply this to reading and writing in all areas of the curriculum. When homework activities are given, they will link to our teaching of phonics and allow children the chance to practise these skills outside of school. Reading books are carefully monitored and given according to the child’s exact stage of development. Phonics display posters have been designed in-house specifically to be used as visual aids as class displays and as sound mats for children’s tables. These are the same in each class with images matching and linking with our handwriting approach. As staff, we strive to instil a love of reading and show this ourselves during shared story times with our classes and by allowing children to have autonomy over choosing their own library books for home and by allowing them access to reading books during lunchtime break.

Art

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

At Buxton Primary School, art is a vital part of our curriculum providing a means of expression for all our children. Our Art and Design curriculum aims to engage, inspire and challenge pupils through a knowledge-based curriculum.  Our focus is to equip all children with the necessary skills and knowledge to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. The Art curriculum gives children an insight into the working methods of known artists and the influences of different cultures throughout the world, past and present. Important links are also made to our school locality, such as sketching Buxton Mill when developing drawing skills in Year 6.  

Across the school, we aim to provide broad opportunities for children to become proficient in drawing, painting, textiles, 3D, printing and collage. Creativity, through art, craft and design is valued and celebrated by the whole school community. Our children have access to a broad range of experiences to enhance their learning of art and design, including after school clubs, enrichment activities, trips, visiting local artists and art days.

Our school timetable ensures all our children have creative opportunities for art in all classes.

The national curriculum for art and design aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • Become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • Evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • Know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

Pupils are taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.
  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

We understand that Art stimulates creativity and imagination. It provides visual, tactile and sensory experiences and a special way of responding and understanding the world. It enables children of all abilities and backgrounds to communicate what they see, feel and think through the use of colour, texture, form, pattern and different materials and processes.

Through learning about the roles and functions with art, the children can explore the impact it has had on contemporary life and that of different times and cultures. The appreciation and enjoyment of the visual arts enriches all of our lives.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


Photography

Photography enrichment courses provide opportunities for children to develop skills that they may otherwise not experience

Collaborative art

There are many examples of collaborative art around the school where children have worked together towards a common goal

Progression of skills

As children develop their knowledge, opportunities are given to practice these skills like they are here on World Book Day

Art inspired by reading

Mini galleries celebrate children’s accomplishments in art

Cross Curricular Links

Writing inspired by art

Whole school art days

Artists visit school to teach children techniques and build on their prior learning

Cross curricular links

Children develop skills when learning about days in our history

Design Technology

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

At Buxton Primary School our intention through DT teaching is to provide all children with a real-life context for learning. As an inspiring and practical subject, we intend to prepare children to deal with an ever-changing technological world, encouraging them to become creative and resourceful problem solvers, working both independently and as members of a team. Children are supported to learn alongside each other with sessions adapted to suit the variety of needs Buxton children show. The school uses funding for disadvantaged pupils in order to ensure practical session equipment is provided for all. Adult support is high meaning that children of all abilities have an equal opportunity to learn these tricky practical skills.

We teach them to be inspired by real world opportunities and relevant problems, identifying needs and developing a range of ideas and solutions in a variety of contexts. By researching past and present technologies and applying knowledge learnt across other areas of the curriculum, children build their confidence, resilience, practical and analytical skills. Furthermore, they learn to overcome challenges and improve designs and products, all the while finding motivation and meaning for their learning.

Food technology is an important focus of our DT curriculum and we have a purpose-built mobile kitchen unit. Children learn to prepare and cook nutritious food, setting them up for a healthy future beyond the classroom. We also provide additional cooking experiences through our enrichment sessions and after-school clubs.

Children get the opportunity to further enhance their skills through extra-curricular opportunities such as homework projects, Family Learning Days and through Forest Schools.

By the time children reach Year 6, they will have had experience of food technology, textiles, design and construction; they should be confidently performing everyday tasks and applying their knowledge, understanding and an increased level of skills as they progress through the school. They will be on the way to becoming risk takers and innovators and will have used a range of tools, resources and materials, including the use of IT, to create effectively constructed and aesthetically pleasing results. This, along with a strong focus on the importance of evaluation, allows children to adapt and improve their work, providing them with not only a sense of achievement but a strong foundation for the next step of their learning and a key skill for life.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.

Homework Projects

Children have the opportunity to further develop their imagination and skills through explorative projects at home

Residentials

Children on residential get to further develop their DT skills, here they are designing and building their own boats

Enrichment

Children experience cookery as part of enrichment sessions to develop their skills

Family Learning Days

Teachers planned Easter bonnet design sessions progressing children’s skills across the school incorporating textiles, levers & pulleys, sculpture and pop-ups

Community Projects

Children worked together to design and create projects in our local community

Varied curriculum

Children develop a wide range of skills as part of their design technology learning

Computing

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

At Buxton Primary School we want all pupils, including pupils with SEND, higher attainers and those who are disadvantaged to thrive as responsible, digital citizens. Technology is everywhere and will play an increasingly pivotal part in our pupil’s lives. Therefore, we model and educate our pupils on how to use technology in a positive and safe way.

At Buxton, we use the Purple Mash scheme for our discrete learning, which has a detailed progression of skills, to ensure that pupils learn key concepts at an age appropriate level. Pupils regularly revisit core skills as they progress through the school. Children focus on three core strands: computer science, digital literacy and information technology. Revisiting these skills allow pupils to demonstrate their knowledge with increasing depth, whilst consistently introducing new topics.

Our pupils are confident and understand what technology can allow them to achieve, therefore our computing curriculum encompasses skills that will benefit them beyond the school gates.

Teachers embed computing across the whole curriculum to make learning creative and accessible. This is achieved through the use of iPads and computers for research in subjects, such as history and geography, as well as recording findings and carrying out experiments in science. Other subjects also form a focus of our computing lessons such as ‘making music’ in Year 2 which closely links to our music curriculum. Our enrichment activities allow children to explore technology in an unrestricted environment; children have experienced sessions from photography-editing as well as recording their discoveries in orienteering. 

We recognise that technology can allow pupils to share their learning in creative ways and we enable them to do this through providing opportunities to use technology in a cross-curricular way. Our school offers additional technologies: speech to text, text to speech and enlarges keyboards to enable pupils with SEND to work independently and confidently across our curriculum. Alongside this, we use a wide variety of programmes for interventions and workshops such as Spelling Frame, Reading Eggs and Maths Seeds.

Children regularly use technology to take images of the local area and record changes, making frequent cross-curricular links with art and geography.

It is also our aim to help children to understand how to navigate the complexities that ever-changing technology presents in our modern life. Our curriculum is continually adapted in line with new technologies and the most up-to-date research, such as introducing a new unit in Year 4: ‘An introduction to artificial intelligence’, which teaches children what artificial intelligence is, how to manage safety and risk around this subject along with how it used in our daily life and to consider the future of AI. This adaptation to modern times is crucial to secure successful futures for our children.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


iPads

Children have individual iPads to enhance their learning

Enrichment

Photography enrichment teaches children skills for a modern world

Geography

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes.

National curriculum 2014


Geography is about understanding the world we live in. At Buxton, children are encouraged to develop a greater understanding and knowledge of the world, as well as their place in it. Our geography curriculum enables children to develop knowledge and skills that are transferable to other curriculum areas. Geography is an investigative subject, which develops an understanding of concepts, knowledge and skills.

Our whole curriculum is shaped by our school vision which aims to enable all children, regardless of background, ability or additional needs, to flourish and to achieve their very best.

We teach the National Curriculum, supported by clearly defined progression; this ensures that skills and knowledge are built on year by year and sequenced appropriately to maximise learning for all children. Existing knowledge is checked at the start of each new topic and new vocabulary is explicitly taught. Therefore, teaching is informed by the children’s starting points and takes account of pupil voice as children are able to convey what they would like to learn about. Lesson content and tasks are designed to provide appropriate challenge to all learners, in line with our commitment to inclusion and extensive opportunities for learning outside the classroom are embedded in practice.

The curriculum at Buxton Primary School enables children to develop knowledge and skills that are transferable to other curriculum areas and which can and are used to promote their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. We aim to develop an awareness of the diverse nature of the UK and global populations and the contributions different societies, communities and individuals have made to human understanding. They will have opportunities to collect, analyse and present data and use maps, atlases, globes and digital mapping.  With the current and ongoing issues our world is facing, we also educate our children so that they become compassionate citizens that care about our earth.

It is important that children develop the skills of a geographer by fully immersing them in all areas of the subject. Geography is taught in blocks across each year group so that children can acquire depth in their learning. The local area is fully utilised to achieve desired outcomes, with opportunities for learning outside the classroom and where children can discover more about the make-up of their community. As children progress throughout the school, they develop a deep knowledge, understanding and an appreciation of their local area and its place within the wider geographical context.  School trips and fieldwork are provided to give first-hand experiences, which enhance children’s understanding of the world beyond their locality and offer further relevant and contextual learning. Children at Buxton have the opportunity to complete field-work studies, travelling where possible to a range of local environments walking to the local park or water mill within the village or going on trips further afield such as the Norfolk Broads, Cromer and Holt Country Park to experience them first hand: disadvantaged children may not otherwise have these experiences.

Cross curricular outcomes in geography are specifically planned for, with strong links between English and Maths lessons identified, planned for and utilised. Higher attaining children are provided with opportunities to write extended pieces of work incorporating a variety of genres, for example – persuasive holiday brochures. The local area is also utilised in our Enrichment sessions for photography of both human and physical features as well as for skateboarding.

By the time pupils leave Buxton Primary School they will:

Have a secure knowledge of where places are, what they are like and how they are similar and different to other places.

Have an understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected and how much human and physical environments are interrelated.

Have an extensive base of geographical knowledge and vocabulary.

Have developed the ability to apply questioning skills and use effective analytical and presentational techniques.

Be able to reach clear conclusions and develop reasoned arguments to explain findings.

Have developed and frequently utilised fieldwork and other geographical skills and techniques.

Aspire to discover more about the world, through reading, travel or the media.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.

History

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

“A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.”                                                                                                                                                                    The National Curriculum


At Buxton Primary School we aim to deliver an exciting history curriculum that is accessible, interesting and enjoyable for all pupils. Our curriculum has been developed with our children and locality in mind.

Our history lessons enable pupils to feel secure with not only their understanding of Britain’s history but also the history of our world.  We ensure that previous knowledge is built upon in such a way that it can be used and developed across our children’s time at Buxton.  We do this by carefully planning our lessons in a way that shows a clear progression of skills, vocabulary and expectations.  All lessons are differentiated and often include practical aspects.  This is done to ensure that all children, including those who have SEND, are on our Pupil Premium register or are higher attainers, access learning that is suitable for their individual abilities.

At Buxton, we encourage our children to be curious.  Our plans include open ended questions to motivate our children to think deeper and discuss their learning amongst their peers.  We believe that team work is an integral part of children’s academic and holistic development and this is something that we actively consider when planning and delivering our history curriculum.

Our lessons enable children to investigate, research, think critically, debate and delve into historical events.  We often use technology to provide the children with opportunities to research a topic themselves and we have found this to be an excellent way to engage children, particularly in the older year groups, who are at the stage where they want more independence.   We regularly invite historical experts into school to run learning days/workshops and alongside this, we go on historical visits to further enhance the children’s learning and make history memorable for them.  Living in Norfolk, we have access to a wealth of historical sites and we make use of these wherever possible so the children have a secure understanding and appreciation of where they live.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


Exciting lessons

Children learn in interesting ways to promote retention of new knowledge

Cross Curricular links

Learning about the Great Fire of London through Design and Technology, Art and English Writing

Historical visits

Children get hands-on with historical artefacts on school visits

Marking significant days

Children complete activities to mark significant historical days in our history

Victorian Day

Children enjoy dressing up to immerse into a historical world

Visitors

Visitors develop our children’s curiosity and understanding of world history

Languages

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

Primary languages are not a requirement in Key Stage 1, but in Key Stage 2 Language learning is compulsory. Teaching may be of any modern or ancient foreign language, and should “ lay the foundations” for foreign language learning in Key Stage 3. Whilst there is no statutory requirement to teach a language in all classes, we believe it’s an important and valuable part of the curriculum and so encourage teachers in KS1 to dedicate some time to looking at other languages in addition to the French learning that happens in KS2. Pupils will start learning songs, basic vocabulary and some instructions which will give them a head-start in KS2 and will develop the right attitude towards other cultures and language learning and at the same time, as research proves, also develops literacy skills in their first language.

The main aim of language teaching at Buxton is to enrich the curriculum by developing the children’s love of a new language as they consolidate their understanding of their own.

Our primary language learning is not only designed to be progressive, building on prior listening, reading, speaking and writing skills, but also to encourage diversity and an acceptance and understanding of other cultures and ethnic groups beyond our community.

As such, our primary language learning also serves to promote our fundamental British Values, using it as the basis to frame the prominence of language within a culture. By exploring similarities and differences between the French and English languages and cultures, our children learn to appreciate how to relate to others. As such, by building on vocabulary and sentence structures to do with various aspects of life in France, we are able to further their tolerance and encourage harmony between different cultural traditions, enabling our students to acquire an appreciation for and respect for their own and other cultures.

We use ‘Salut!’ in order to model correct pronunciation and ensure all pupils can access language learning, by playing listening games, reading along in interactive books,  singing along to songs or writing about themselves in French – to name just a few examples. This has proved successful in supporting our SEND children as well as challenging high-attainers.

We offer extra-curricular provision in the form of language clubs which have included British Sign-Language, Spanish and Chinese as their focus. Thanks to all of this our children leave Buxton Primary School feeling motivated and encouraged in their language and culture learning as well as having the tools necessary to continue to make the most progress with their French at KS3.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.

Music

Intent, Implementation & Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)


Music is an integral part of life at Buxton Primary School. We aim to ensure children’s confidence and skills are well developed so that they are able to take these skills to the next step in their education and develop them further.

At Buxton, we recognise that experiences in music are a key element for children to build the inner confidence that will set them in good stead for their futures, no matter what path they decide to take.

Music is planned in-line with the statements laid out in the National Curriculum. Across all year groups, children experience music in a variety of ways. Charanga is used to develop children’s skills to perform, read and explore music. Children develop their musical talents through our programme of performances which happen every year for every year group and aims to develop their performance skills, including musical talents, over time. Alongside this, we also offer our children discrete learning opportunities through weekly sessions that run throughout the year in Samba (involving a wide variety of instruments). We also provide opportunities for children to develop new instrumental skills through offering expert-led sessions such as recorder music tuition.  

Children develop their knowledge of a range of music styles and genres from different times and places. These are explored through the language of music via active listening, performing and composing activities, which enable understanding of the context and genre. Charanga is a scheme of work which offers a topic-based approach to support children’s learning in music. A progression grid has been developed using the key objectives from the National Curriculum and Charanga, which is used by teachers to ensure children experience a progression of skills. Through our music lessons children are actively involved in a wide range of musical opportunities. Children develop their singing voices, using body percussion and whole body actions, and learning to handle and play classroom instruments effectively to create and express their own and others’ music. Through a range of whole class, group and individual activities, children have opportunities to explore sounds, listen actively, compose and perform.

We support children of all abilities who contribute to sessions in different ways. Children with SEND (Special Educational Needs and Disabilities) receive adaptations to sessions to ensure they can access learning and develop skills alongside their peers. We use our Pupil Premium funding to support tuition for those children who are disadvantaged and our higher attainers are encouraged to extend their skills by taking more complex roles in music sessions.

Music skills are developed in a cross-curricular way through sessions such as singing times tables, geography songs, French songs, horrible history songs and class assemblies. Children are also encouraged to develop musical skills; our reception children regularly set up mini bands and staging to make their own music. Our children also experience music through extra-curricular clubs and our enrichment sessions such as performing arts, singing clubs and performance skills clubs. Music is core to every child’s experience at Buxton Primary and forms an integral part of each child’s learning journey.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


Samba

Our children love their sessions with ‘Samba-man’ Jon

Charanga

Having fun with the glocks in Charanga music lessons

The children learnt ‘Fight Song’ in sign language and shared at a class assembly.


The children sharing their Samba skills in an assembly.


The children showing off their glockenspiel skills at assembly.

Physical Education

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

At Buxton Primary School we deliver high-quality PE lessons which inspire our pupils to reach their full potential and develop their growth mind-set in order to succeed in lifelong activity. We offer all children the opportunity to participate and compete in sport and other activities, helping them to cultivate their fine and gross motor skills, as well as learning values such as fairness and respect.

Each week, our pupils participate in at least two PE lessons. Some sessions are led by our PE specialist and some by our teachers. Our PE syllabus is based on the Get Set for PE curriculum with a clear progression structure from Reception to Year 6. The progression of skills have been planned in order to build on the skills needed to meet the end of Key Stage objectives in the National Curriculum. This incorporates not just physical skills, but also understanding how our bodies work and developing links in learning to the science curriculum.

A highlight of our calendar year is our whole school sports day, whereby family and friends are invited to join in and support our pupils with the intent of developing team work and resilience, as well as a sense of community.

To extend the skills of our higher attaining pupils, we encourage children at the end of Year 5 and throughout Year 6 to become Sports Leaders. These pupils design and implement sports games and activities, during break and lunch times, to offer younger pupils the opportunity to play and challenge themselves alongside peers from other year groups. The intended outcome is for all pupils to develop fundamental skills: creative, social, personal and cognitive. 

For those children with a keen interest in sports and physical activities, we offer a range of sports clubs, such as football, dodgeball, tennis, cricket, tag rugby and netball. We regularly organise extra-curricular competitions, outdoor physical visits and through pupil premium, hire sports coaches to broaden the experiences and encourage problem solving and social skills within our pupils. Our enrichment sessions provide additional opportunities for more specialist physical activities, such as scooting, skateboarding, performing arts and yoga. The breadth of our offerings ensure our disadvantaged pupils are able to engage in activities that they would not otherwise have the opportunity to.

All children experience a range of learning including those with additional needs who are supported well with specialist equipment and adult support in all activities. Our Key Stage Two children through the cycling proficiency scheme. Swimming is taught to ensure every child has the opportunity to learn how to swim at least 25 metres unaided. Children have PE incorporated in other subjects and often use this when transitioning between academic subjects such as through Jump Start Jonny.

Children have many opportunities to develop OAA (outdoor adventurous activities), particularly through visits such as our Year 4 and Year 6 residentials to the Horstead Centre and Whitwell Hall, also day visits such as the Hautbois Centre for our Year 5 children, but also through our Forest School sessions.

To further our pupils’ engagement in our local community, we work alongside specialist instructors who teach and develop skills in sports such as karate and archery within our school. We aim to equip our pupils with skills they can foster beyond the school gates.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


Sports Day

An annual celebration of children’s abilities and a chance for the community to get together

Outdoor Adventurous Activities

Children go on visits to ensure they experience the challenge that OAA can provide

Enrichment

All children take part in ‘enrichment’ where they develop skills that are not ordinarily found in the National Curriculum

Cycling Proficiency

Children in KS2 take courses in cycling to ensure their safety on the roads and to develop their skills

Physical learning outside of lessons

Children enjoy games to develop their SEMH (Social Emotional and Mental Health) skills

Local events

Children regularly take part in multi school events in a variety of sports

Competitions

The British Schools Dodgeball Championships

Sponsored events

Children take part in sponsored events to raise money for peers

Religious Education

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

At Buxton, the learning of a wide variety of cultures and religions is of high priority. This is in part due to our location and the cultures that children are exposed to locally. Buxton and the local area are mainly mono-cultural which means it is vital we are able to provide a robust range of learning experiences for our children.

This means our curriculum is designed to ensure children experience a wide variety of religions and experience these in different ways across the school. The document ‘Multicultural Learning at Buxton’ gives an idea of some of the ways in which we explore the learning of different cultures across the school.

As with all our subjects, we expect all children to develop their knowledge and understanding of religion through providing differentiated learning according to our children’s abilities and needs. A core part of learning about religion is learning about tolerance and to be understanding of others’ view points and customs, therefore much of the curriculum is interlinked with PSHE, where children also learn about cultures and explore viewpoints in an accepting environment.

At Buxton, we believe that children have the right to be given a broad understanding of religion and culture which is an essential tool for becoming a citizen of the world. We provide opportunities to develop children’s knowledge and understanding of world religions and reflect challenging questions it provokes. We aim to develop children’s knowledge and understanding of world religions and consider how the beliefs of others impact on their lives and the lives of others. We also provide opportunities for children to reflect on their own beliefs and encourage them to appreciate and respect different cultures in today’s society.

Our RE lessons, which are based upon the Norfolk Agreed RE Syllabus, build upon knowledge across the terms and years so that children can place new ideas within their overall understanding in a step by step way. Our lessons are taught in an open environment so that children have the confidence to ask questions to further their knowledge and learn about showing acceptance to all.

Sequences of lessons have been arranged so that children build their understanding of vocabulary and religious ideas. These are further cemented through a variety of extra-curricular activities and enrichment such as multicultural days, educational visits and cross-curricular links.


The documents available for download below detail the requirements within the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


Right to withdraw from RE lessons

Parents/carers have the right to withdraw their children from all or part of Religious Education. Those parents/carers wishing to exercise this right are invited in to see the Headteacher who will explore any concerns and discuss any impact that withdrawal may have on the child.

The school will ensure that parents who want to withdraw their children from RE are aware of the RE syllabus and that it is relevant to all pupils and respects their own personal beliefs. Parents will be made aware of the learning objectives and what is covered in the RE curriculum and should be given the opportunity to discuss this if they wish. The use of the right to withdraw should be at the instigation of parents and it should be made clear whether it is from the whole of the subject or specific parts of it. No reasons need be given. Where parents have requested that their child is withdrawn, their right must be respected, and where RE is integrated in the curriculum, the school will need to discuss the arrangements with the parents or carers to explore how the child’s withdrawal can be best accommodated.

Once a child has been withdrawn, they cannot take part in the RE programme until the request for withdrawal has been removed.


Visitors and assemblies

Children regularly learn about religion first-hand from religious groups

Educational Visits

Year 6 visit the Norwich Buddhist Centre to build a deeper understanding of their practices and history

Relationships and Health Education (RHE)

Relationships and Sex Education (RSE)

Intent, Implementation and Impact

The information below gives an overview of our curriculum:

  • intent (what is taught and why it is taught)
  • implementation (the teaching activities used to teach the curriculum), and,
  • impact (what pupils have learned from the curriculum)

Relationships and Health Education

The National Curriculum explains that RHE is an important and necessary part of all pupils’ education and it should be delivered in a way that will equip pupils with a sound understanding of risk and with the knowledge and skills necessary to make safe and informed decisions.

At Buxton Primary School we aim to embed children with skills and knowledge that they not only use at school, but at home, in our local community and out in the wider world. This includes all requirements within the compulsory Relationships and Health Education, but also areas that would fall under ‘Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education’ (PSHE) or Citizenship Education.

We strive to deliver a curriculum that creates kind, safe and considerate children and we do this through a variety of lessons, activities and questions that aim to nurture the holistic development of all our children, including those who are higher attainers, those with SEND, and those who are from disadvantaged backgrounds.    

At the start of every academic year, we plan a safety week that ensures children are taught, for example, how to stay safe, both in school and online; how to keep themselves and their personal information safe; High Five Hands (identified trusted adults), Road Safety and Beach Safety. 

All year groups have opportunities, throughout the year, to take part in activities and visits to enhance their understanding of safety.

  • The fire service come to speak to all our pupils and the children have the opportunity to explore the fire engine and equipment. The older children learn about their career and contribution to society, the younger children learn about fire safety.
  • Bikeability is offered to children in Year 3 and Year 4.  The children learn the basics about safe bike riding and do this on the school grounds.
  • Cycling Proficiency is offered to children in Year 5 and Year 6.  This builds upon the skills learnt in Bikeability and the children cycle in the village and learn road safety.
  • Children in Year 6 attend ‘Crucial Crew’, a multi-agency education project, where they are shown a more in depth insight into the world of our emergency services and the jobs that they do.

Outdoor learning (‘Forest Schools’) plays a key role in the delivery of our RHE curriculum.  Each class has two hours of ‘Forest Schools’ a week on a termly basis, delivered by our Outdoor Learning lead.  During this time, children will complete a range of fun and engaging tasks that focus on building children’s Social, Emotional and Health Educational needs. Other skills developed are teamwork, building, friendship, nature, decision making and conservation. 

Alongside this, children who require additional SEMH and SEND support have additional Forest School time and alternative provision time where they can work in a smaller group, with closer adult support/guidance with the aim of further supporting their self-esteem, wellbeing and resilience. 

The children are taught a range of RHE and PSHE (Personal, Social, Heath and Economic education) themes through our learning in Votes for Schools sessions. Children are taught to discuss and debate various topics ranging from current affairs to ethics, social issues and British Values.  These lessons encourage children to think critically, engage with and talk about real life issues. In addition to this, all children get a vote in every lesson, which gets tallied up and compared with other schools across the country, something that the children get very excited about seeing. These results are shared with key influencers in the topics such as CEOs and MPs.

Our restorative approach in our behaviour policy further supports children to build an understanding of others and develop confidence and independence in their ability to resolve conflict and work with others.

Through the variety of opportunities we offer, children at Buxton are provided with a broad and balanced understanding of the world. This ensures the very best opportunity for them to become well-rounded future citizens.

RSE (Relationships and Sex Education)

At Buxton Primary School, we believe that relationships and sex education (RSE) enables our children to become healthy, safe, independent and responsible members of society. RSE aims to help them understand how they are developing personally and socially, and tackles many of the moral, social and cultural questions and areas of learning that are part of growing up.

RSE is taught as both explicit lessons, using the Educator Solutions RSE scheme of work, and is also embedded in other areas of the curriculum such as science and RHE. Sessions within the RSE scheme are taught in an open environment and are active and practical so that all learners have the opportunity to learn effectively, including those with SEND needs, children that are disadvantaged and higher attainers.

We ensure that children have the opportunity to consider the information and develop their own values, attitudes and opinions. We do this by ensuring children have access to effective, age-appropriate relationships and sex education (RSE) within an inclusive and supportive learning environment, using non-biased resources. Pupils can build on their prior learning by revisiting some themes to further develop knowledge, values and skills in an age and stage-appropriate manner. Our extra-curricular opportunities such as enrichment and after school clubs support the development of skills through enabling children to work across classes and build friendships, expanding their knowledge of different families and lives. We ensure that the core part of our RSE curriculum is designed to enable children to learn about diversity and different cultures, supporting their ability to become well-rounded future citizens.


The documents available for download below detail the National Curriculum requirements that have been arranged and adapted to suit our children in our locality. They explain the coverage of the subject across all year groups and the progression of skills to show how children’s knowledge is built upon year on year. Vocabulary, which is shown either as a separate document or integral to the skills progression, has been designed to be progressive and deepen children’s understanding of the subject.


Assessment

As per our assessment policy (available in our policies section), there are various aims for assessment. In this subject, we assess children continually through observation and through the work they produce. Teachers use this information to inform future planning and adjustment to activities to support children’s individual learning needs. They carry out teacher assessment at the end of each term and parents are informed of progress throughout the year with formal reporting of achievement against age related expectations at the end of the year.


National Curriculum Requirements and right to withdraw

Relationships and health education is compulsory for every child and forms part of the National Curriculum. Sex Education is a recommended element from the DfE. Parents / carers have the right to withdraw their child from this element of our curriculum. Those parents/carers wishing to exercise this right are invited in to see the Headteacher who will explore any concerns and discuss any impact that withdrawal may have on the child.

It is recommended that parents / carers who are considering this, read the ‘National Curriculum Requirements letter Feb 2024’ under the ‘Information’ tab, then ‘Office’ then ‘Key Letters’.

The school will ensure that parents who want to withdraw their children from Sex Education are aware of the syllabus (detailed in the links above) and that it is relevant to all pupils and respects their own personal beliefs. Parents will be made aware of the learning objectives and what is covered and should be given the opportunity to discuss this if they wish. The use of the right to withdraw should be at the instigation of parents and it should be made clear whether it is from the whole of the subject or specific parts of it. No reasons need be given. Where parents have requested that their child is withdrawn, their right must be respected.

Once a child has been withdrawn, they cannot take part in Sex Education until the request for withdrawal has been removed.


Working with the Parish Council

Our school councillors work with the local Parish Council to help make decisions about our local area.

Regular Visitors

Visitors to the school teach the children about different careers and roles in our society such as a visit from the Fire officers

Crucial Crew

Year 6 take part in Crucial Crew every year teaching them about safety in a variety of areas such as: gas, electricity, rivers, RNLI, drugs, fire

Lunch clubs

Children build their social skills through taking part in lunch clubs where children of different ages and backgrounds come together

Forest Schools

A large part of learning in Forest Schools is about social communication and understanding each other

British Values at Buxton Primary

Democracy

  • Children involved in democratic processes, e.g. choosing school councillors, rewards and incentives.
  • Democracy linked assemblies      
  • School council
  • Eco Council
  • Sports Ambassadors  – representing Buxton       
  • Buxton Buddies (Anti bullying ambassadors)
  • Buxton Advocates
  • Responsibilities given in each class

Rule of Law

  • School behaviour policy – all are aware of the policy and it is understood and followed
  • Class rules – all children contribute, understand and abide by the rules
  • Pupils have regular opportunities to reflect, e.g. learning, their behaviour, during assemblies
  • Pupil interviews and surveys
  • Parent/carer questionnaires relating to behaviour, safeguarding, etc
  • School links with local PCSO.  Police visit and carry out assemblies linked to themes
  • Assemblies with a focus linked to the law, e.g. school rules, Parliament, etc.
  • Teaching of the importance of rules.
  • Votes for Schools

Mutual Respect

  • PSHE curriculum, Votes for Schools
  • Outdoor Learning
  • Positive relationships encouraged and modelled, pupil – pupil, adult – pupil
  • RE curriculum;
  • Anti-Bullying initiatives
  • Restorative approach
  • School Council, Eco Council, Sports Leaders; Peer Mentors, Buxton Advocates
  • Competitive Sports link – sports day, intra/inter sports events
  • Our Community themes
  • Buxton Buddies

Personal Responsibility and Liberty

  • Understanding responsibility in school in terms of behaviour and learning attitude
  • Pupil roles in school
  • School values – known and articulated by school community members
  • Church assemblies and Church services
  • Class contracts
  • Buxton’s Anti-Bullying Code
  • Restorative Approach following behaviour incidents (links to school values)
  • Home/School agreements
  • Responsible roles such as Buxton Advocates

Tolerance of Culture, Faith and Others

  • RE Curriculum
  • Accessibility of school
  • Cultural theme week/day, e.g. Diwali, Chinese New Year, St George’s Day, Easter, Christmas
  • Festival Assemblies  – celebrations e.g. Harvest, Diwali, Yom Kippur
  • Reflection opportunities in Assemblies, Church Services
  • Macmillan Nurses
  • Food Bank
  • Comic Relief
  • Aylsham Cluster Trust
  • Local charities: multicolour day
  • International Emergency appeals: Ukraine support
  • Children in Need

Since we are located in a mainly mono-cultural area, it is important that we ensure our children are given opportunities to experience a wide variety of cultural learning and ensure that our curriculum teaches our children about diversity. In order to ensure our children have successful futures working in our multicultural and diverse society, we are always seeking ways to enrich our curriculum with this in mind. Here you will find just some ways we support our children to develop a good understanding of other cultures and be curious about diversity, locally, nationally and internationally.